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minimalist

How Minimalism Helps Me Achieve My Goals

Posted in Lifestyle
on August 23, 2017

Yes, I know what you’re thinking. You’re thinking it’s impossible to achieve your goals with the help of minimalism. And, I completely get it because I was in your position a year ago. I never thought a particular lifestyle could help me achieve my goals.

But IT DID, which is why I’m so excited for today’s post because I want you to achieve your goals, and live a life of bliss. I want you to live your best, happiest life. And I know you have a ton of goals you want to accomplish. So, if you’re interested in hearing how a minimalist lifestyle can help you achieve your goals, then keep reading.

How minimalism helps me achieve my goals:

1| Fewer Distractions

You know the saying, “cluttered room, cluttered mind?” That couldn’t be more accurate. When you have a ton of stuff, you have a ton of stuff going on in your mind. Therefore, you are too focused on cleaning your room, reorganizing your closet for the tenth time this week, and worried about dusting, dishes and everything else. With minimalism, you remove those distractions from your mind, so you can focus on what you’re truly passionate about whether that’s writing a book, starting a blog, or advancing your career.

2| Less Stress

When you’re surrounded by stuff, it’s stressful. See point one for reference. But seriously, your mind not be able to accomplish everything on your to-do list because you’re so caught up in all the stress from all the stuff you have in your life. Too much stress means you’re probably exhausted and too mentally drained to even think about starting that book you’ve always wanted to write. Remove the clutter and the crap you don’t want or love. And you’ll find stress immediately sweep away from your mind. Now you have energy to focus and stay on top of the goals you have.

3| More Time

Want to know what takes up a ton of time? Cleaning and cooking and organizing. Want to know what helps cut down on cleaning and cooking and organizing? Minimalism! Less stuff in your home means less time spent cleaning that stuff in your house. Which means more time for the things you’re passionate about and things you want to achieve.

4| Intentional Living

For example, spending time more wisely. Now that you have all this wonderful time added to your day, you have time to live an intentional life because you’re not going to be bogged down by clutter, stress, debt and everything in between. You have room in your schedule and your life to live the way that will bring you absolute bliss. And if that’s not making you want to pursue minimalism, I don’t know what will! Unless money is your motivation…

5| More Money

Because you won’t be spending money on things you don’t need or love, you’ll have a lot more money saved. More money means more money to go toward your passion projects like publishing a book, taking courses to help your skills in social media or an dart class. More money will also help you down the road for retirement, so you’re not living paycheck to paycheck—you can finally spend money on necessities and fun things like traveling! Whatever your goals are, you might have to spend money in some way, and minimalism helps you save money so you can spend it where you truly want to spend.

So, what goals are you trying to accomplish? Do you think that minimalism can help you achieve your goals? Make sure to leave your comments share your stories below!

Ki Signature

 

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5 Things All Minimalists Hear

Posted in Lifestyle
on August 21, 2017

There are many reasons I don’t enjoy labeling myself as a minimalist. But, the main reason is because there are a lot of questions and comments thrown at you at any given time. Most of the time, I’m more than okay with answering questions because I’m an unconventional minimalist. So, my answers definitely differ than other minimalists out there. It’s surprising, though, that people judge your life decisions and how you choose to live especially when it doesn’t impact them in any way.

Today I’m sharing five questions and comments minimalists have definitely been asked, or they’re been asked something quite similar. I hope you get a kick out of this post as I’ve enjoyed writing it since many of these have come up A TON in the last month. Make sure to leave a comment below telling me the comments and questions you get if you’re a minimalist. Or, if you’re not, feel free to leave your own questions below. Don’t forget to check out my posts on five tips if you’re interested in minimalism because I know a ton of people loved that post!

1|Can you fit all your clothes in one suitcase?

No. Definitely not. Not even close. See, although I go rid of more than 60 percent of my wardrobe, I still have quite a bit of clothes. But, I wear Every. Single. Item in my closet and there’s nothing that I don’t love and wear or use regularly. If I find that I’m not wearing something anymore is when I decide if that item should go. I get a laugh out of this question because that’s when people say, “Well, you’re not a minimalist unless you have only 35 items in your closet.”

No, y’all, that’s not a thing either. You can be a minimalist and still have the wardrobe you want to have because minimalism is not a one size fits all concept.

2| Are you judging my car/home/closet/office/desk?

Judging isn’t the right word. This doesn’t have to do with minimalism for me as it has to do with my anxiety and OCD. Cluttered spaces make me anxious and uncomfortable, which is why minimalism simply works for me and my life. The less I own, the less than owns me. I’ve seen only positive benefits from downsizing my wardrobe, makeup collection, and everything else because it keeps my OCD and anxiety under control. If you’re happy with the way your desk/office/home/closet is, that’s fine. But if you’re looking to declutter—call me first to help!

3| Do you live in a tiny home? 

Nope. I live in a townhouse that perfectly fits everything we need. Josh and I have no interest in owning a tiny house, but we are beginning the home-buying process. I’m thankful to know that when the time does come to move—we will be able to fit everything we own in the house we decide to buy. One of the perks of minimalism is that you only have what you need, so we won’t be stressed about packing up our house to move somewhere else.

4| I could NEVER be a minimalist.

I said the same thing. I never wanted to be one either. I was the girl who had 23 pairs of jeans, 37 cardigans (not kidding) and about 30 handbags on top of mountains of jewelry I didn’t love or wear and other things that I never wore either. Believe me, I was the definition of a maximalist. Everything changed once I moved because I realized I had too many things I didn’t like. I didn’t want my home to be a storage space; I wanted it to be a warm, inviting, space where I would enjoy relaxing and living. I was able to do that by removing pieces from my closet, room and house altogether.

5| When you buy a house, you won’t be a minimalist anymore.

What does the even mean?

Sure, will we have more stuff than we have now? Definitely. But are we going to go out and buy things we don’t need or like just to have art on the wall or have a chair? Definitely NOT! That’s not who we are as people and it’s not in line with our values. Josh and I are (thankfully) similar that way because we both understand that buying a house is expensive, so why would we put ourselves in debt and buy a home we can’t afford? Then, on top of that, buy MORE STUFF to fill that home we can’t afford? For us, that doesn’t make sense, so we plan to buy a home that will fit our needs without going overboard. We have no intention on losing that minimalist mindset simple because we’re buying a house.


Fellow minimalists, what are some questions and comments you have heard recently? And non-minimalists, what are some questions you have about this lifestyle? Make sure to share all your thoughts in the comments below!

Ki Signature

 

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5 Tips If You’re Interested in Minimalism

Posted in Lifestyle
on June 7, 2017

So, you want to be a minimalist?

Well, to be honest, I don’t truly consider myself a “minimalist” because there are a ton of expectations surrounding that word that I don’t agree with. But, I do tell people that my lifestyle has minimalist/intentional living ideas in it. Whether you’re just beginning your minimalism or you’re reevaluating your lifestyle altogether, here are 5 tips I give to people who are interested in pursuing a more simple, minimalist lifestyle.

1| It’s not all about Pinterest

Just because you see photo after photo of a perfectly white kitchen, white furniture, with very little color doesn’t mean that you aren’t a minimalist if you don’t want to replicate that in your own home. Although there are people who love white everything in their home and who a minimalist, that doesn’t mean all minimalists live in a perfectly white home. The same can be said for your wardrobe or anything else in your life. Just because it’s shown that way on Pinterest doesn’t mean it’s the only way.

2| Don’t make it overwhelming

The issue with calling yourself a minimalist is that you are immediately placed in a box where people place unnecessary expectations on you, and you feel trapped, overwhelmed and stressed. The purpose of this lifestyle is to remove stress in your life. If you decide that there are some things that are overwhelming about this lifestyle, take a step back and give yourself time. You don’t need to rush this process. You don’t need to follow through on every process just because some YouTuber told you to, which brings me to my next point.

3| THERE ARE NO RULES

I could write a novel about this because I’ll keep things short and sweet. There are no rules. There is no godly book of minimalism that gives a code to live by that you must follow or you will never be able to identify as a minimalist. You don’t need to downsize to a tiny home. You don’t need to be able to pack all your belongings in one suitcase. There are no rules with this lifestyle, so don’t let anyone tell you otherwise. What works for your will not work for someone else. That’s okay. That’s how it should be.

4| It can fit your lifestyle

The goal is to identify what your main goals are with wanting to pursue this lifestyle altogether. Are you looking to stop spending money unnecessarily on clothes, jewelry, shoes? Are you looking to save so you can pay off your debt? Are you looking to simple more simply because life has been stressful? Whatever your goals and intentions are: write them down and revisit them frequently to check your progress. Use that to work minimalism into your life that won’t bring any stress and will help you to achieve your goals.

5| You can stop/change 

Similar to anything else in life, if there’s something you don’t like about what you’re doing with this lifestyle, you can change it or stop it completely at any time. It’s okay if you work through some decluttering and downsizing to a smaller home if that’s your goal. If you want to practice saving, and conscious shopping but you don’t want to practice other areas of minimalism—that’s great, too. The point of this journey is to find what works best of your and your life. Something might not work for you, but you shouldn’t stress over it. Find what you love, and pursue it. Find what you don’t love and get rid of it.

I hope this helped anyone who was questioning whether or not this lifestyle would work for them. Although it can be very overwhelming to think about changing your life, remember that everything is temporary. You can apply this lifestyle to fit your needs and your life to help achieve your goals. You don’t need to follow any rules except the rules you give yourself on this journey. If anyone makes you feel stressed about not being “minimalist” enough, remind them that’s your journey and you’re happy with the way you’re living.

Have you ever considered minimalism? What is holding you back from trying this lifestyle? What questions do you have for anyone who is a minimalist?

Ki Signature

 

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Why Minimalism Isn’t “One Size Fits All”

Posted in Lifestyle
on May 22, 2017

 

If you’re someone who has been considering living more minimally, you’ve probably heard some blatant lies and assumptions about this lifestyle like:

“I heard those people only wear neutral-colored clothes.”

“You’re going to live in a tiny home?”

“Are you only going to own 30 things?!?”

“But you can’t have makeup/jewelry/anything non-essential…”

“Well your home isn’t ‘minimal’ like *insert person here*”

“You have WAY too many clothes to be a minimalist.”

Let’s set the record straight for anyone who is confused. Minimalism isn’t, and shouldn’t be, a one-size-fits-all concept.

There, I said it.

While I love that people are jumping on the bandwagon of simplifying their lives and pursuing a more minimalist lifestyle, there are some problems that come with popularity of a trend or lifestyle in general.

Personally, I don’t feel comfortable identifying as a minimalist because people assume I live in a tiny home, only own 30 items of clothing, only have black, white or grey furniture/clothes/anything a person can own, etc. The things you see on Instagram and Pinterest when you type in “Minimalism” isn’t the only version of how a minimalist can live. There are minimalists who also live in a house. There are minimalist who have an extensive wardrobe or makeup collection. There are minimalists who don’t wear black or white.

Like all other roles in life, identifying as a minimalist can place you in a box that people unnecessarily place you in, which is not only wrong but it also gives people the wrong interpretation of what minimalism is.

Like everything else, minimalism is dependent on the person and their lifestyle. 

A mother of three who identifies as a minimalist will not have the same lifestyle, or home as a 18-year-old student who identifies as a minimalist. There are no set boundaries or rules that “The Book of Minimalism” shares with its most dedicated followers. (If you couldn’t tell by my sarcasm, that book isn’t real.) But rather, it’s about understanding the key concept of minimalism and how you can appropriately apply that concept to your life. And what is that concept, you ask?

Discovering what’s essential and non-essential, and being able to focus on the essential while removing the non-essential. 

If you realize that condensing your wardrobe from 400 pieces to 200 pieces is minimalist enough for you, that’s great. If you’re getting rid of your TV because you simply don’t watch it, awesome. If you’re in love with cooking, and can’t part with your cookware because you use it every day, keep it! The point of minimalism is to find what’s important to you and find what you truly love and need in your life. Minimalism is also about being able to remove all of the things you don’t love and don’t need in your life. It’s a process and a journey, but it is definitely worth it.

Minimalism is a wonderful thing. But with social media, people are under the impression that there is only one way to live a minimalist lifestyle; and I’m here calling shedding some light on that myth. Minimalism can change to fit the needs of your lifestyle and your home. The way you view minimalism can be completely different than how other person views it. It’s all still minimalism.

What does minimalism look life to you based on your life? I would love to read all the different responses based on your lifestyles, so make sure to share in the comments below!

 

Ki Signature

 

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Minimalism is More than Decluttering

Posted in Lifestyle
on April 17, 2017

I don’t want anyone to think that I’m not giving props to the people who donated/tossed/sold more than 50 percent of their wardrobe. (Seriously, that is something to celebrate because it’s a HUGE achievement in your minimalism journey.) But, I think it’s equally important to know that your journey shouldn’t end with your closet and your belongings.

At first, I thought my experience with minimalism was going to begin and end with my closet. Once I began to practice minimalism in my everyday life, I realized that I craved to live a more simple life altogether. I wanted to have more time, more happiness and less stress or worries. I wanted to practice mindfulness and simplicity in a busy, hectic life.

It took awhile to learn what would be the best way to achieve my desire for a more minimalist lifestyle that went beyond my closet. Here’s how I took my minimalism journey to the next step:

1| Practice conscious shopping

Stop unnecessary shopping. We have all been in that situation where we haven’t been shopping for a few months, so we treat ourselves after spending freezes on good deals, etc. Instead of treating yourself to a jacket or makeup, treat yourself to an experience like a nice dinner, a spa day or an overnight trip with your friends. These will mean much more than a sweater you found on sale that you don’t need. Also, ask yourself if you truly need that item you’re looking to buy. If you don’t, be strong enough to walk away.

2| Practice saying no

“Ma’am, would you like a free gift with purchase today?” If you don’t need it, say no. If a friend offers an old handbag, say no. If a store is offering free, trial samples for beauty products, say no. The more you practice saying no, the easier it will become. The goal is to be ruthless of what you allow into your home. Your sample-sized beauty products are going to sit in a box and you’ll forget about them within a few weeks. If you truly don’t need it, say no.

3| Practice mindfulness

Instead of rushing with a cup of hot coffee in a travel mug to get your breakfast sandwich, wake up 20 minutes earlier to enjoy your coffee and breakfast at home. Instead of rushing your morning routine altogether, set your alarm for an hour earlier than you normally would. This way, you’ll give yourself enough time to get ready in the morning without forgetting your lunch and presentation information. Enjoy the little moments of each day. This makes a huge difference.

Although decluttering and getting rid of anything non-essential is a huge component of minimalism and practicing a minimalist lifestyle, it isn’t the only component of that lifestyle. It’s about working toward living a simple life where there is less stress and more time for happiness. That is why this lifestyle is appealing to many people.

Are you on a journey toward living a minimalist lifestyle? What has been the easiest or most difficult part of that journey? Make sure to share your thoughts and experiences in the comments below!

Ki Signature

 

 

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