5 Ways to Succeed at Work in Your 20s

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As a Marketing Director, I’ve learned a lot about my position in the field over the last few months. Recently, I’ve been given positive feedback from corporate management on how I’ve handled this job. I want to share how you can be a 20-something, get noticed and succeed at your job even if you’re first starting out. If you have any additional tips to share on this topic, make sure to leave a comment below on how you’ve been succeeding at your job!

1| Do the tasks no one else want to do.

I know what you’re probably thinking. “Why would I want to the tedious, busy work no one wants to do?” It’s simple: it shows you’re willing to put in the work. You should even do this if you’re in a position of power. Even though I’m a Marketing Director with an assistant and interns, I would never ask them to do a task unless I’ve done it myself. I believe it’s important as a leader to show you’ve done the time-consuming tasks that no one wants to do. When an intern accepts these tasks willingly, I think very highly of them.

2| Come in early.

Don’t be the 20-something employee who strolls in at 8:33 a.m. If there’s one quality I admire in a leader or worker, it’s someone who is willing to come into work 15 minutes early to make sure they’re all set and working by the time work begins. It shows you’re committed to your job and you’re ready to begin the day. When you walk in late, take extra time to get settled into work and don’t start until 8:50 or later, that’s something I noticed as a negative trait. Go to work prepared for the day.

3| Ask for more work.

If you finish a project at 3 p.m., don’t wait around and catch up on social media and pretend to be busy for the last two hours of work. Instead, go out of your way to ask for more work, or to begin a new project a little earlier than you anticipated. You’re showing that you’re capable of more responsibilities and you’re able to complete projects in a timely matter. This will make a positive impression at work.

4| Learn when to speak up and shut up.

I say this with the kindest intentions. It is so important to share your thoughts and ideas at a company; but it is equally important to know when to keep quiet and listen to others as well. Know when you should or shouldn’t talk in meetings. However, if  you’re directly asked to share your ideas for a project—speak up! You will be recognized by your coworkers even if your idea isn’t necessarily used.

5| Dress/Work for the job you want.

Have you ever heard the saying, “Dress for the job you want, not the job you have?” It’s equally important to work for the job you want as well. If you’re starting out as an assistant, but you want to work as a director—make sure you’re working toward that goal. Dress professionally and work professionally so that your coworkers or boss can see you’re a qualified candidate to move up within the company. Don’t do the bare minimum at work. Work hard and you will see the results of that hard work.

What tips would you add to this list? How have you worked to get yourself noticed at your job? Make sure to leave a comment below!

 

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What it’s REALLY Like to Work in Marketing

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For those who haven’t been up to date on my life recently, I began my first job as a Marketing Director for a mall. Over the last two weeks, I’ve learned a ton about the marketing field that I didn’t learn in school, which is why I’m sharing some things I’ve learned about marketing within the first two weeks of my job.

You NEED to work ahead:

3:30 rolls around, and the day is winding down a little bit. You have two choices: relax and after seven hours of work, or begin tomorrow’s work. You always need to work ahead. If something is due on a Friday, I make sure it’s done by Wednesday. Why? You never know what will come up the next day whether it’s a two-hour meeting, or a problem with an event. When you fall behind on work, you’ll feel stressed and overwhelmed. So, when in doubt—work ahead.

70 percent of your day involves emails:

I had no idea how many emails one person could receive in one day. It’s absurd. I think I receive an average of 40 or more emails a day. Whether you’re emailing about a sponsorship, event, advertising request or proposal, emails are a huge part of my day-to-day work life. Although this doesn’t seem like a fun aspect of the job, it’s vital in order to get things done. My tip is to make sure your email folders are hyper organized so you don’t lose track of anything!

Planning and organization is essential:

I’m a huge post-it note/agenda junkie. I thrive off of making to-do lists, and checking things off of my to-do list is arguably my favorite past time. This has helped me a ton with my job because if you’re not on top of your daily tasks, you will fall behind. If you don’t keep your desk and files organized, you will lose important papers, and will regret it later. Make sure everything is labeled and put away after using it, so it doesn’t end up somewhere else!

Check and double check your work:

This is especially important for writing advertising proposals and sponsorship proposals. If you have a mistake in your grammar, or in your financial outlines, NO ONE will take you seriously. It also could cost you money. For example, if you clearly state your client isn’t responsible for printing or providing creative work, you’re costing your company $1,000. You don’t want to be the reason your company pays for your mistakes. Proofread everything at least three times before pressing send.

Don’t just wing it:

Guys, there are a lot of situations where you can just “wing it,” but your marketing job should not be one of them. If you’re not sure of an answer or how to handle something, Google it, or ask someone else. It’s okay not to know the answers. But don’t go into a situation where you’re winging it and hoping everything will turn out well. More often than not—it won’t go over well with you and your corporate office. Plan and prepare for everything just in case.

I hope this helped you all to learn a little more about the marketing field, especially for those who are interested in marketing as a future career path.

What were important lessons you learned at your job within the first few weeks of working? Make sure to share your lessons below!

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